PUBLICATION

Development of the anterior lateral line system through local tissue-tissue interactions in the zebrafish head

Authors
Iwasaki, M., Yokoi, H., Suzuki, T., Kawakami, K., Wada, H.
ID
ZDB-PUB-200715-10
Date
2020
Source
Developmental dynamics : an official publication of the American Association of Anatomists   249(12): 1440-1454 (Journal)
Registered Authors
Kawakami, Koichi, Suzuki, Tohru, Wada, Hironori
Keywords
Rspo2, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, neural crest, neuromasts, placode
MeSH Terms
  • Animals
  • Cell Differentiation/physiology
  • Cell Proliferation/physiology
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
  • Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics*
  • Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism
  • Lateral Line System/embryology*
  • Neural Crest/metabolism*
  • Wnt Signaling Pathway
  • Zebrafish
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics*
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism
PubMed
32658373 Full text @ Dev. Dyn.
Abstract
The distribution of sensory organs is important for detecting environmental signals efficiently. The mechanosensory receptors of the lateral line system, neuromasts, are stereotypically distributed over the head and body surface of fish, although how neuromasts arise in these predetermined positions during development remains unclear.
We investigated development of the anterior lateral line (ALL) system in zebrafish head. The ALL neuromasts formed in the predetermined positions through proliferation and differentiation of 1) non-migratory lateral line primordia, 2) migratory primordia, 3) interneuromast cells connecting pre-existing neuromasts, and 4) budding primordia. We demonstrated that R-spondin2 (Rspo2), an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, is required for the development of a particular set of neuromasts associated with hyomandibular cartilage. Further genetic analyses suggested that Rspo2, which emanates from the hyoid mesenchyme, acts on the adjacent neuromast progenitor cells to stimulate their proliferation through activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.
This study has revealed novel mechanisms for neuromast positioning through local tissue-tissue interactions, providing insights into the development and evolution of the vertebrate head. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Genes / Markers
Figures
Expression
Phenotype
Mutation and Transgenics
Human Disease / Model Data
Sequence Targeting Reagents
Fish
Antibodies
Orthology
Engineered Foreign Genes
Mapping
Errata and Notes